Luisetti-Monti sub clover

Luisetti - Monti sub cloverKey features

  • Excellent early winter growth
  • Breed for shorter growing seasons
  • High seed yields
  • Regenerates reliably
  • Improved tolerance to Phytophthora Root rot and Clover Scorch disease
  • Well suited for low rainfall areas and slow draining soil

Agronomy and Management

Establishment 
Sowing Rate (Dryland): 5kg per hectare in a pasture mix with 5kg of a later flowering sub clover and low rates of grass. As a pure sward sow at 10kg per hectare.
Seed Bed Preparation
It is recommended to sow following autumn rains into a fine, well prepared seedbed. Seed should be sown with a starter fertiliser and Group C inoculant applied to the seed.
Weed Control
As sub clover is sensitive to some post emergent broadleaf herbicides until established, good pre sowing weed control is vital. Please seek the advice of your local agronomist to ensure satisfactory results.
Sowing
Best results are achieved when direct drilling sub clover no deeper than 1cm into a fine seedbed. Press wheels or light rolling will assist establishment in most cases.

Grazing
Sub clovers respond well to grazing once established, this is generally when plants will not easily pull from the soil.

A good seed set is vital in the first year of a sub clover pasture to ensure regeneration in the 2nd and subsequent years. To encourage seed set, medium to heavy grazing through late winter /early spring is recommended. When sub clover starts flowering stock numbers should be significantly reduced for up to 8 weeks until seed set has occurred. Ideally spell the paddock from mid flowering for 6 weeks.
Best regeneration will occur the following autumn if the remnant dry growth is grazed hard in summer. Hay making in the establishment year should be avoided as it will significantly reduce the amount of seed remaining for 2nd year regeneration.

Performance

Monti has been extensively tested in trials across South Australia and Victoria. Monti demonstrates exceptional early season growth, out-yielding other yanninicum cultivars Trikkala, Riverina, Gosse, and Napier in almost all assessments. In field studies conducted at three sites in south-east South Australia and western Victoria over 2008-2009, Monti produced 46 % more early winter dry matter than Trikkala. Increases in pasture availability at this time of year are particularly valuable.

Table 1 Average seasonal dry matter yields (kg/ha) at 3 southern Australian sites during 2008-2009
 Early WinterLater WinterSpringWinter
Monti1321261154793169
Trikkala908238352583234
Riverina637211454082162
Gosse1013236653951341
Napier583174753871642

Being an early maturing yanninicum cultivar, Monti is well adapted to take advantage of shorter growing seasons whilst still producing high levels of dry matter. The early maturity and high seed yields also lead to a more reliable regeneration and persistence over time.
Reliable regeneration is also dependent on the amount of soft seed available after the autumn rains. Table 2 shows that the soft seed levels of Monti had increased to around 33% by May, similar to those of Trikkala and Gosse. In contrast, Riverina and Napier had the lowest soft seed levels and demonstrated the poorest seedling regeneration. Performance Best regeneration will occur the following autumn if the remnant dry growth is grazed hard in summer. Hay making in the establishment year should be avoided as it will significantly reduce the amount of seed remaining for 2nd year regeneration.

Table 2 Days to first flower, soft seed content, seedling regeneration and seed yield
 Days to flower differenceSoft seed
content
(May%)
Seedling
Regeneration
(plants/M2)
Seed Yield
(kg/Ha)
Monti03314051975
Trikkala+23613202074
Riverina+5144481766
Gosse+5347651599
Napier+14171911204